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People don't have confidence in the system to resolve their concerns

“I received a written apology two months after the incident. No fault was admitted, no regret expressed and, as far as I know, their practice remains unchanged. My complaint remains completely unresolved as far as I am concerned.”

People do not feel that existing complaints systems listen to their concerns and put things right.

Many of those we spoke to simply wanted an explanation, an apology, or a simple change. Instead, they found themselves drawn into a bureaucratic and adversarial process that did not reflect their reason for complaining. Most worryingly of all, people aren’t complaining because they are scared of the repercussions, such as being victimised by staff.

3 in 5 (61%) of those who complained did not feel they were taken seriously enough. Fewer than half (49%) ever received an apology. 1 in 4 (26%) said they had not complained because they were worried it would have negative percussions on their treatment or care.

Kelvin’s experience

Kelvin wanted to raise concerns after his wife, who had been diagnosed with cancer, was kept waiting for two hours – without explanation or support – for her first chemotherapy appointment.

He wanted to ensure the experience would not be repeated during the rest of his wife’s treatment, and that other patients received better care on their first visit.

“I received a written apology two months after the incident. No fault was admitted, no regret expressed and, as far as I know, their practice remains unchanged. My complaint remains completely unresolved as far as I am concerned.”

Complaints > Problems > People don't have confidence in the system to resolve their concerns